Anuko | Emergency vets?

For the first time in almost four years of having Anuko, he had to receive veterinary treatment this week that wasn’t his usual vaccinations or yearly check up. The poor little sod had been having sickness and diarrhoea for the last couple of days, and I woke up on Wednesday morning to blood in his stool. He was also not eating much and drinking little too. So I rang the vet and had an appointment booked an hour later.


In the waiting room Anuko perked up a little bit when he saw other dogs and was vocally expressing how disappointed he was that he wasn’t allowed to play with them.  I was being careful with him as I had my ideas; Anuko had stuffed hooves the day before it all started and I was petrified that he was experiencing some kind of perforated or blocked stomach. Annoyingly enough, the same day he had the stuffed hooves, we also ventured out into an area of Telford we hadn’t explored yet. He got himself into a very stagnant pond that reeked to high heaven and was crawling with baby frogs. I had no idea if he had picked up any Giardia or Coccidia parasites in our woodland walk, bacteria from the pond, damage from the hooves or what.


Upon seeing our vet Duncan, Anuko got a quick abdominal exam and displayed tenderness and pain in his lower GI tract. He said he couldn’t feel anything in his upper GI tract which indicated that blockages there were unlikely. A thermometer up his rectum told us he was running a temperature and these alongside bloodied stools and vomiting indicated he was suffering from a form of acute colitis.


There was still a possibility of blockages, so Anuko was given an anti-vomiting injection. To say he screamed the practice down is an understatement! Even his microchipping when he was a puppy didn’t cause such a vocal commotion as that little injection did. I was told to keep an eye on his vomiting, and once the injection would start to work, if any vomiting persisted then it would be a sign of something a lot more serious and he’d need to be brought back in for X-rays and further testing.


He was weighed (21.6kg), Synulux antibiotics were prescribed as well as some probiotic paste and we were good to go. I also picked up some Panacur on our way home just in case his conditions worsened and Giardiosis were more likely to be the culprit.


It’s been quite quiet since. He slept for the rest of the day, his injections must have knocked him right out. The good news however is that no more vomiting has continued and we can all breathe a sigh of relief. He is currently on rice and cooked chicken whilst his body mends itself, but his appetite has also picked back up and he’s starting to drink more too. He is still sleeping mostly but I’m already noticing slight perks in his energy as it’s slowly coming back.


I’m still not entirely sure what caused this. I was almost adement it was the pond that carried and passed on something, but I’ve been told frogs do not breed or live in dirty water. Perhaps his wet fur picked up something on the way home? I did bathe him and put diatomaceous earth in his water when he came back that afternoon. He is also up to date with his vaccinations so I guess we will never know 🤷🏻‍♀️


Alabama Rot is making itself known in the UK, and Giardiasis/coccidiasis can get pretty nasty especially if dogs become dehydrated. My vet recommended I buy an extra syringe of probiotic paste to keep in my cupboard, so I bought some from Pets At Home Here. He suggested whenever any diarrhoea in the future from muddy walks or dirty puddles pops up, to squirt 5ml of the probiotic into his mouth just to help repopulate the good bacteria within the gut. This is good advice for my followers, too. 

Keep your doggies safe during walks, especially coming back from particularly muddy walks from wet or wooded areas. Hose down all the dirt from the fur, face and paws immediately. Cleansing and sterilising shampoo can also be used but aim to use sparingly. Diatomaceous Earth, which can be purchased here, can be rubbed into the dry coat to help combat fleas and also put into food to combat intestinal worms (ensure it is food grade DE). DE is essentially powdered fossils, which act like tiny shards of glass to puncture invading parasites and their eggs to dry them out and kill them. It’s completely harmless to our and canine skin.
Some symptoms of Giardiasis to look out for include lethargy, vomiting, poor appetite, flatulence, abdominal pain and diarrhoea. This parasite particularly likes wet areas and can be passed from animal to human, too. If you suspect your dog may be suffering from Giardiasis, Panacur (which can be purchased here) will help to rid of any invading parasites. Please check with your vet first and foremost. Dehydration an occur in parasitic infestation and can be potentially life threatening.

Woofs & Licks!