Anuko | Emergency vets?

For the first time in almost four years of having Anuko, he had to receive veterinary treatment this week that wasn’t his usual vaccinations or yearly check up. The poor little sod had been having sickness and diarrhoea for the last couple of days, and I woke up on Wednesday morning to blood in his stool. He was also not eating much and drinking little too. So I rang the vet and had an appointment booked an hour later.


In the waiting room Anuko perked up a little bit when he saw other dogs and was vocally expressing how disappointed he was that he wasn’t allowed to play with them.  I was being careful with him as I had my ideas; Anuko had stuffed hooves the day before it all started and I was petrified that he was experiencing some kind of perforated or blocked stomach. Annoyingly enough, the same day he had the stuffed hooves, we also ventured out into an area of Telford we hadn’t explored yet. He got himself into a very stagnant pond that reeked to high heaven and was crawling with baby frogs. I had no idea if he had picked up any Giardia or Coccidia parasites in our woodland walk, bacteria from the pond, damage from the hooves or what.


Upon seeing our vet Duncan, Anuko got a quick abdominal exam and displayed tenderness and pain in his lower GI tract. He said he couldn’t feel anything in his upper GI tract which indicated that blockages there were unlikely. A thermometer up his rectum told us he was running a temperature and these alongside bloodied stools and vomiting indicated he was suffering from a form of acute colitis.


There was still a possibility of blockages, so Anuko was given an anti-vomiting injection. To say he screamed the practice down is an understatement! Even his microchipping when he was a puppy didn’t cause such a vocal commotion as that little injection did. I was told to keep an eye on his vomiting, and once the injection would start to work, if any vomiting persisted then it would be a sign of something a lot more serious and he’d need to be brought back in for X-rays and further testing.


He was weighed (21.6kg), Synulux antibiotics were prescribed as well as some probiotic paste and we were good to go. I also picked up some Panacur on our way home just in case his conditions worsened and Giardiosis were more likely to be the culprit.


It’s been quite quiet since. He slept for the rest of the day, his injections must have knocked him right out. The good news however is that no more vomiting has continued and we can all breathe a sigh of relief. He is currently on rice and cooked chicken whilst his body mends itself, but his appetite has also picked back up and he’s starting to drink more too. He is still sleeping mostly but I’m already noticing slight perks in his energy as it’s slowly coming back.


I’m still not entirely sure what caused this. I was almost adement it was the pond that carried and passed on something, but I’ve been told frogs do not breed or live in dirty water. Perhaps his wet fur picked up something on the way home? I did bathe him and put diatomaceous earth in his water when he came back that afternoon. He is also up to date with his vaccinations so I guess we will never know 🤷🏻‍♀️


Alabama Rot is making itself known in the UK, and Giardiasis/coccidiasis can get pretty nasty especially if dogs become dehydrated. My vet recommended I buy an extra syringe of probiotic paste to keep in my cupboard, so I bought some from Pets At Home Here. He suggested whenever any diarrhoea in the future from muddy walks or dirty puddles pops up, to squirt 5ml of the probiotic into his mouth just to help repopulate the good bacteria within the gut. This is good advice for my followers, too. 

Keep your doggies safe during walks, especially coming back from particularly muddy walks from wet or wooded areas. Hose down all the dirt from the fur, face and paws immediately. Cleansing and sterilising shampoo can also be used but aim to use sparingly. Diatomaceous Earth, which can be purchased here, can be rubbed into the dry coat to help combat fleas and also put into food to combat intestinal worms (ensure it is food grade DE). DE is essentially powdered fossils, which act like tiny shards of glass to puncture invading parasites and their eggs to dry them out and kill them. It’s completely harmless to our and canine skin.
Some symptoms of Giardiasis to look out for include lethargy, vomiting, poor appetite, flatulence, abdominal pain and diarrhoea. This parasite particularly likes wet areas and can be passed from animal to human, too. If you suspect your dog may be suffering from Giardiasis, Panacur (which can be purchased here) will help to rid of any invading parasites. Please check with your vet first and foremost. Dehydration an occur in parasitic infestation and can be potentially life threatening.

Woofs & Licks!

DogFest 2017 | PHOTOS

The festival for dogs named DogFest is over for 2017 and what an event it was. Launched and hosted by the famous Supervet Noel Fitzpatrick, it’s a fun-filled day out for dog lovers and their companions in North and South England.

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This annual event occurs over a 2 week period on their weekends, Saturday and Sunday. For 2017, DogFest North was hosted at Arley Hall, Cheshire and DogFest South was hosted at Knebworth House, Hertfordshire. This was my first time ever attending DogFest and I had the opportunity to attend both South and North DogFest. 

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Throughout the day there are many opportunities for both you and your pooch to get involved. Scattered over the grounds, there were multiple arenas with scheduled agility and talent displays, including DogFest goers having the opportunity to participate in fun competitions such as the Dogs Today Best In Show Competition. In the middle of the festival was a Super Stage where live music acts perform throughout the day, and this includes Noels 45 minute live talk. K9 Aqua Sports brought along a large swimming pool hosting Dock Jumping for those doggies who were brave enough to take the plunge! There were 2 charity walks hosted by Supervet himself called the Great Dog Walk, and hundreds of dog-related stalls on the grounds where you can shop till you drop! 

Arley Hall in particular was absolutely sweltering but we still managed to have a great day. Due to the immense heat, Anuko was not able to participate in many activities there was going for dogs and their owners such as the Have A Go Agility or the Best In Show Comp which we would’ve loved to be involved with otherwise. Also because of the 30oC temperatures, we wasn’t able to stay for Noels entire speech as we needed to return to the shade to cool Anuko down, but we managed to stay for it at Knebworth House. During this live talk, Noel spoke of how he started his first of its kind practice in Surrey, a motivational talk for us companion animal owners but mainly how veterinary medicine is advancing and how it competes with human medicine (and how they should be working together instead). This in particular interested me as my future career choice will be in veterinary medicine so it was great that I got to listen to it at least once. There were smaller plastic pools full of water for the dogs to bathe in and bowls to drink out of everywhere, as well as spare poop bags and even cooling down towels for them to lay on so it was really well catered for any weather possibility. Despite the heat, DogFest was a grand opportunity for Anuko to touch noses, interact and play with hundreds of dogs and the journey home was much quieter than the journey there. He even made some new Instagram friends such as @diesel_and_dom! 

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The majority of the day out, we spent shopping. With hundreds of stalls ranging from treats to accessories, canine massage therapy or quirky new products in the dog industry, I was quite in my element and so was Anuko with all of the free treats! Every stall was different and targeted all price points and breeds. I started my day at Knebworth House at the Canine Massage stall and was taught how to effleurage Anuko, who was also given a free muscle check to make sure all of his muscles were in working order, and ended it with a free vet check up at Vets4Pets. Everything was discounted for show prices so I came home with much more than I thought I’d be able to. The majority of stalls offered free goodie bags to take home and every single person working both days were so incredibly pleasant. I will do a separate mini blog of all the things we bought, and then if there is anything in particular you’d like Anuko to rate, just leave a comment!

I also spent a fair bit of time going around and asking to take photos of everybody’s pooches, all shapes and sizes, as well as recording some of the activities I saw going on which will be on Anukos YouTube as soon as I edit them. I was introduced to many breeds, some I had never even heard of or seen before. The vast majority of the dogs were very socialable and whilst there was a few disagreements (dogs aren’t much different from us you know), there was no scrapping between any of them which was initially a worry of mine, which is the reason for me pe packing a dog First Aid Kit just In case. Any dogs who were a little less social were clearly displayed as so, wearing neon orange harnesses, collars and leashes with “nervous” on them which I thought was really cool. We was all pleasantly surprised by how well trained and friendly everybody and their dogs were! 

The last weekend of the event Anuko got to meet Beverley Cuddy, the woman behind him being a cover dog for Dogs Today August 2016 and he even snuck a picture with her. His cover dog shoot he did with Penelope Malby is probably the most proudest accomplishment he’s ever done and I’ve even framed the magazine cover. At Dogs Today’s stall there was also a blown up version of a blank Dogs Today magazine, where dogs had the opportunity to participate in the competition to become a Cover dog for an issue. To think that we almost didn’t attend the Knebworth House event! 

Overall, the Glastonbury for dogs was an event I’d do all over again, and I’m shocked that I had never been before. A fun and rewarding day out for dog owners or dog lovers, and all dogs come free! I’d recommend to younger puppies to come to events like this, as the meeting of so many different types of canines and would help to build good socialisation skills. Roll on DogFest 2018!

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